Tupac’s voice from the grave: The Don Killuminati album review

Global rating of the product: 4.5 stars

Although Tupac’s Don Killuminati album has been released two months after his death, it had been recorded while Tupac was still alive. However, the CD gives the listener the impression of post mortem testimony.

The circumstances of Tupac’s death remain a mystery to many hip hop fans and many people still speculate about Tupac being still alive.

Tupac Amaru Shakur’s was a spiritual person who used the symbolic of death and resurrection in his music.

In the Don Killuminati, Tupac takes the nickname Makavelli. Did Tupac fake his death? Who knows. Let’s explore his posthumous work.

Dark Bell sounds introduce the dark background for Tupac’s Seven Day Theory. As the heaven darkens with black clouds, Tupac talks against traitors in the music industry and names several names; among them the Death Row label is mentioned as well.

Feel the nightmarish atmosphere of a man on the run. Cellos, keyboards, gunshots and rhythmic beats will intensify the feeling of insecurity that is expressed in the track.

Hail Mary is maybe the best known song on the Don Killuminati album. Revenge is a dish which people of taste prefer to eat cold.

Taste Tupac’s revenge that is spiced up lyrically and well handled instrumentally. The spiritual battle is a battle of mental thoughts and outspoken words during which bad and evil combat good souls with no mercy. You have to use mental dexterity and physical strength to battle the hidden world of the demons whose aim is to destroy you.

Bell sounds, organs, dark voices are mixed up with a joyful « California Love » sounds. Death Row is Tupac’s target in Toss It Up. I really enjoyed the « Play On » theme on the song as well as Tupac’s verbal dexterity.

To Live And To Die In LA contains some soft synthesizers and vocals and introduces you into a festive LA ambiance. Welcome To the City of Angels where life can be a living hell when you’re from the ghetto.
Tupac is a great narrator who teaches you about everyday all day in the LA ghetto, the love, the hatred, the similarities and differences.

Feel a thug’s love for his city.

Blasphemy starts on a noisy background built on multiple voices that represent a legion of demons. Rhythmic beats and lyrical bullets are sent from Tupac’s mouth against his enemies. His words sound prophetic and dissect his enemies intention. The song has some beautiful reggae accents too. Be ready for Judgment’s Day.

Soft balalaika notes start Life Of An Outlaw. If you want to understand thug life, open your ears when Tupac tells it to you like it is. Guitar and bass sound enhance the feelings of a hectic and unsafe life. Outlaws barely rest. Each second can be a matter of life and death. Enjoy the way an astute wordsmith puts creative lyrics ahead.

Krazy unveils the listeners Tupac’s state of mind about the life he lives in the hood. Electric guitar notes totally fit with the thoughts of a hood soldier who feels confused and lost, as he looks back to the past, analyzes the present and envisons his future. You have to keep your head up, no matter what you go through. So many thoughts, so many directions, so much confusion: feel the lassitude and monotony expressed in Krazy.

White Man’z World exposes the harshness of Tupac world and black men’s pain. Even in present times very few white people realize how hard it is to grow up as a black person in a while man’s world, unless they have lived in a black ghetto or they have been close to black people. Open up your ears and your mind to the black ghetto’s prophet who will speak the truth about his folks‘ pain.

Me And My Girlfriend is a description of thug love. Feel the satisfaction of a Bonnie and Clyde couple to be happy to share a life of crime and an immense complicity. Soft guitar sounds will reinforce the romance between thug lovers.

Piano, flute, keyboard sounds, soft vocal introduce Hold Ya Head. Feel the pain that is a constant element in Tupac’s music. An outlaw speaks about hard times and hopes for a better life.

The album closes with Against All Odds. Catchy beats contrast with some sweet flute sounds. Tupac confronts his enemies and takes his final revenge.

Gangsta rapper, street poet, philosopher, Tupac certainly is, among people like Marcus Garvey, a black hero. No matter if he lived the life of an outlaw, Tupac spent his life fighting against oppression, racial discrimination and for more equality between people. His life, his music, his tragic death and « resurrection » on the musical scene as Makavelli make a myth of him.

The thug poet will live on for generations of hip hop heads.

Copyright 2006 by Isabelle Esling
All Rights Reserved

4 thoughts on “Tupac’s voice from the grave: The Don Killuminati album review”

  1. Stop the government before its too late. They are stripping you of your rights. They will destroy the costitution. We will become a police state. Please dont let this happen. Take action. REVOLT.

    KILL THE ILLUMINATI!!!!!!
    +10001+_:>:__=/><666

  2. 2pac Amaru Shakur M4k4veL1 is simply the best rapper in the world and it will be the best rapper and stays always the best rapper in the world …Im simply a fan but a firely fan of 2pac ..yes eminem the k1nghow all the world says but deep in the heart of the fans of 2pac he is still there …So I just wanna say that he is the BEST 😀 …And u muthafuckers the cops there stay …cetch your asses on the flour …still not trying tio get the Killer of 2pac…how 2pac sad always >: fuCk all of ya…Fuck you and have a good day.. 😀 P.S fAn of 2pac–> The LegenD.

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