Eminem

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A lot of ink has been spilled about Eminem and a lot of authors will probably write about him within the next years. From controversial to acclaimed, the famous rapper barely leaves people indifferent.

Yet a lot of misconceptions about him are prevailing about Marshall Mathers and some of them are due to the fact that he is too often presented as a white rapping artist, while his connections to the Detroit rap scene are occulted by many Eminem biographers. This is one of the main reasons why I decided to write ” Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene- White Kid in a Black Music World”.

It would be really hard for people to understand who Eminem actually is without mentioning the Detroit scene that birthed him as an artist.

Why you can trust my book

I have ten years of expertise in music journalism during which I have been expressing on Eminem, the Detroit hip hop scene and numerous hip hop related subjects. I have gathered a lot of verified facts about Marshall Mathers, the man and the artist.

Because of his warped sense of humor contained in his wicked lyrics, Eminem has often been depicted as a hate monger by the press, often by people who were quite ignorant of the world of hip hop. You could barely separate Eminem from his musical environment.

Wanting to go deep into the roots of Detroit hip hop, I have been in touch with numerous local rappers, I interviewed and reviewed many of them, debatting with them: My journalistic curiosity lead me to investigate about how Eminem was introduced to the Detroit black rapping scene. People ought to know that African- American rapper Champtown played a major role (that is underlined in my book) in Eminems early rapping years, around 1992. Champtown was the first to offer him some consistent musical collaborations.

Besides presenting Eminem in depth, my intent was also to unveil some known and hidden local Detroit emcees talent ( sorry about the ones that didn t get a mention, there are so many talents in Detroit).
I interviewed some key rappers in Detroit, including Big Proof of D12.

I also gave voice to local rappers who don t necessarely agree with Eminem and his role within the Detroit scene, like 5 ELA.

If you want to understand Eminem from an objective perspective and learn more about the extraordinary Detroit rapping scene, get your copy on Amazon.

I promise you a good read!

Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene reviewed: my book is getting positive reviews so far…thanks to all of you who took time to read and review it:)

Journalist at Michigan Citizen , Steve Furay, gave my book a review in Michigan Citizen. Have a look!

Donna Kshir, writer and SEO, publisher of Hayden Kian, Detroit Examiner columnist
Rating of the product: 5 stars

If you want to know Eminem the rapper, you first have to understand who Marshall Mathers is, where he comes from, what inspired him, his fight and struggle to succeed as an artist, and how those events made him the man he is today.

A young Marshall came from very humble beginnings. Those early beginnings also came complete with a dysfunctional family and a history of drug dependency. He knows what it feels like to be different, to be bullied and experience racism. Experiencing life on both the black and white sides of the Detroit ghetto provided a young Marshall with a valuable look into two very different, separate cultures giving him a love for music that would set the stage and eventually change rap music forever.

Marshall would spend a decade perfecting his rhyming skills and writing lyrics, but also building a reputation. His dream of rapping appeared impossible and maybe foolish to some; his family, friends and even his educators. No one wanted to believe in Marshall, making it that much harder for him to believe in himself, but his best friend Proof would give him enough courage, strength and inspiration that eventually made him one of the most successful artists of our time.

Marshall had several approaches to music, but using his turbulent youth and relationships with his mother, Debbie, and girlfriend, Kim, created a rebellious alter-ego that would set the stage and make him the superstar he desired to be.

Whether you have been a fan of Eminem for years or if have recently discovered him, this book is for you! I highly recommend EMINEM and the Detroit Rap Scene: White Kid in a Black Music World. Isabelle answers the tough questions so many fans desire to know. This book goes deeply within the reach of Eminem’s early years, the Detroit Rap Scene, what it is like to be a struggling artist in Detroit and his rise to the top with many added bonuses.

Isabelle’s insight alone gives the book credibility, but she digs much deeper showing how Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene has impacted our American culture. This book is more than a well documented biography of the rapper’s life. Isabelle has been given her readers a level of access to Eminem that I feel no other journalist has come close to. Her insight takes the reader deep into the heart of the Detroit ghetto long before Eminem was a superstar.

Review by Donna Kshir ~ Author, Detroit Examiner Columnist and Yahoo Contributor

Contel Bardford, Detroit writer
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I introduced this book a while back. Finally got around to reviewing it. Here goes …
Love him or hate him, you’ve gotta respect Eminem for the impact he’s made in the music biz. Before the artist formerly known as Slim Shady hit the scene, white rappers were largely viewed as comedy routines. This includes noted acts like Vanilla Ice and The Beastie Boys, who some might call legends. Em changed the game, and the environment he grew up in has a lot to do with his meteoric rise to the top.

Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene: White Kid in a Black Music World gives the reader an up close and personal look at the controversial rap superstar and the local rap scene in Detroit — past, present, and a glimpse at the potential future as well. This book features exclusive photos and interviews with many people who know Marshall Mathers on a personal level, including the legendary DJ Butter, Dogmatic, and the late great Big Proof, his bestfriend and the founder of Detroit’s D12.
In addition to the struggle that almost saw him give up before blowing up, the author sheds light on sensitive subjects like Em’s strained relationships with Kim and his Mother, as well as the drug overdose that nearly killed him. She also drops knowledge on how he is perceived by artists on the local scene, which I found very interesting seeing that many don’t feel he has done enough to put the city on the map, despite coming back for his crew in D12 and helping Detroit talents like Obie Trice and Royce D 5’9 obtain worldwide recognition.
What I enjoyed most about this book was simply witnessing how much work the author put into it. She revealed some interesting things I didn’t know about the Detroit rap game myself, and I’ve lived here all my life. It’s obvious that a lot of effort went into tracking down artists, putting these interviews together, and making sure the facts were accurate. There are several books about Mr. Mathers out there, but this one offers a perspective that is fresh, unique, and captivating from beginning to end.
I highly recommend this book to fans of Eminem and hip hop lovers in general.
Copyright© by Isabelle Esling
All Rights Reserved

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If you are eager to discover my two books, here are some links where you can read some exerpts. Wishing you a good read!

Your author,

Isabelle

EMINEM AND THE DETROIT RAP SCENE-WHITE KID IN A BLACK MUSIC WORLD

UNWRAP YOUR PRESENT

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In an article entitled ” Hats Off to the Detroit Scene”, author Contel Bradford, of Detroit, gave ” Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene” a review.

Who is Contel Bradford?

Contel Bradford is a professional writer of many trades — aspiring
screenwriter, affiliate marketer in training, published author. He
excels at writing articles on internet technology, specializing in
areas that range from email marketing and web hosting to social media
and SEO. Mr. Bradford is also the author of the iPod and iTunes
Handbook and the riveting urban fiction novel Thug Nation.
Learn more about this multi-talented man of mystery at Contelbradford.com
HATS OFF THE DETROIT SCENE, by Contel Bradford

I sometimes call Detroit the land of the forsaken. It sucks more than it doesn’t, and to be honest, I can’t wait to leave. Having said that, I’ve lived here for like ever, so I can’t help but love it. This is why I used to get a little frustrated at the lack of Detroit’s presence in the rap game.
It’s nothing I get too bent out of shape about, it just seems like the presence is stronger in other cities, and Detroit kinda gets shit (shitted or shat) on. Then I’m reminded how we’re home to some of the greats in the game. Esham, Big Proof, and Eminem are among the greats that comprise the Detroit rap scene.
Speaking of Eminem and the Detroit rap scene, I’d like to introduce you to a new book, which happens to be called, Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene: White Kid in a Black Music World. Sweet how I tied that in, eh?
All kidding aside, this book is written by Isabelle Esling, music journalist and a good friend from a distant land known to me as Isa. I can’t quite remember how we met, but it was online perhaps 8 or 9 years ago. Our connection was a shared love for D12. She told me how she was planning to write a book about Em and D12; I told her how I was just getting started as an author and had a book I was selling in Detroit.
At least this is how I remember it going down. Keep in mind I’ve lost countless brain cells since then.
Anyway, Isa was very instrumental in me establishing a presence of my own online. I let her read my first book, Dark Decision, and she loved it. She shared this in her circles and generated buzz that helped me sell future books such asThug Nation. Her support of my work also helped me connect with a long lost family member, who saw some of the reviews she wrote about my book, and build the credibility I would go on to use to start a career in freelance writing.
Aside from being a good friend, Isa is a great journalist who is passionate about her work, and that passion shines through in her extensive coverage of Eminem and other artists on the Detroit rap scene over the years.

If you want a candid look at Eminem, the underground rap scene in Detroit, or just want to read something fresh and interesting, I highly recommend this book. You won’t be disappointed.
You can learn more about Isabelle and her book, Eminem and Detroit Rap Scene, here (or there, the link, ya know?).

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By Steve Furay
Special to the Michigan Citizen

Read the original article here

DETROIT — A new book about the life and career of Eminem has now been released, satisfying fans throughout the world with more material about the rap superstar. But here in Detroit, the city he claims, the book raises questions about whether he has returned the favor for the gifts that Motown has given him.

“Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene: White Kid In A Black Music World” draws readers’ thoughts to the tensions between Black and white communities in one of the nation’s most segregated cities. The movie “8 Mile” played on the same idea, a white rap underdog trying to become recognized in the Black community.

Author Isabelle Esling, a French native living in England, wrote the book from numerous magazine and television interviews with Eminem, plus her own interviews with members of Detroit’s hip hop community.

Esling describes the hard life Eminem experienced growing up, through poverty and stress of troubled family members. Eminem’s success as an artist is in his ability to compose lyrics honest and imaginative about his rough upbringing, always with a punchline ready.

When his music first became popular in 1999, Eminem’s global fame was a perfect storm of talent and imagination reflecting the spirit of the age. Hyperactive youth faced the future of a troubled world economy, with media feeding the public violence on a 24-hour cycle.

“Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene” focuses on the genius of his writing, but his dedication to helping Detroit is also questioned. DJ Butter, for instance, was an early collaborator with Eminem and his group D12, and tells his experience of Eminem’s Shady Records having bad business with local artists.

“When Eminem and D12 went against me,” says DJ Butter in the book, “I just never understood how I could break bread with those guys before the big label deals and they couldn’t break bread back. They made me out to be the bad guy.”

Eminem has become a world symbol for Detroit, but here he is an artist who gained fame and wealth and then left. His upbringing in the city’s hip hop scene of the 1990s was heavily based on helping to make the community a better place, building businesses and opportunities for youth to escape life in the streets.

The famed Hip Hop Shop, open during the mid-1990s as a hub of the Detroit hip hop scene, was a turning point in Eminem’s career, where the Saturday afternoon open mics were flooded with a community of highly talented artists.

The success of artists like Elzhi and Royce Da 5’9” validate the Shop’s creation of top skilled emcees through artistic interaction, and Eminem was a key participant of this collective. The common chant was “3-1-3,” the area code that everyone wanted to help make better for the future.

Proof, known to the world as a member of Eminem’s group D12 before his death in 2006, is referenced in the book as a close friend, mentor and artistic inspiration. Proof was also in the group 5 ELA, or 5 Elementz, where he and members Thyme and Mudd worked at Hip Hop Shop and set up the open mics each Saturday.

“He was the leader (of D12),” says Mudd. “They listened to whatever ideas he came with. He could sit down, calm them down, bring them together enough to whereas they respected him as a leader.”

Though Proof left 5 ELA, Mudd and Thyme give testimony that he always wanted his own success to be used for the betterment of the community. This aspect of Eminem’s upbringing in hip hop through Proof is not discussed in “Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene.”

“We ain’t trying to be out there on the mountaintop,” says Mudd. “We’re with the people, we’ve always been with the people. We’ve always brought the community together. To me it’s just the right thing to do. It’s like a church or a synagogue — once you get the congregation you can lead the flock, just as long as you’re leading them in the right direction.”

Today, 5 ELA’s community spirit lives through 5e Gallery, located on Michigan Avenue in Corktown. The gallery is owned and operated by DJ Sicari, the group’s newest member, who was also employed at the Hip Hop Shop. The space struggles for financial resources like others in city, but Thyme views this hip hop community center as an opportunity to help realize the dream of the “3-1-3” movement. This is the unrealized potential of a “White Kid In A Black Music World.”

“The hip hop in this town is an economic force that is never used,” says Thyme. “It’s always used for someone’s particular personal gain. We can’t even think about none of them. All of us that’s here doing it, we have to say the responsibility is ours. How you gonna handle that?”

“Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene: White Kid In A Black Music World” by Isabelle Esling is available for purchase online at www.Amazon.com

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It is official: Eminem announced a new album in 2013! Source: Killer Hip Hop Dot Com

To commemorate the Detroit Tigers’ return to the World Series, Eminem is releasing a limited edition cap resembling the Tigers’ own cap. Instead, we have a backwards E that resembles the Tigers’ D, and on the side we see the years in which Eminem has dropped an album. The list starts in 1996 with Infinite and ends in 2013. So it’s only fair to assume that we’re getting a new Eminem album in the coming year. Stay tuned Stans. In the meantime, buy the hat here.

Read more.

Are you a lot into Eminem s music? Do you like Detroit hip hop? Are you wondering about Marshall Mathers biography and career? Would you like to know more about Eminem, D12 and the whole Detroit rap scene?

Then my book is the answer! Enriched with some exclusive material and some inside info, it will give you the answers you are looking for…people who are currently reading it are giving me tremendous, positive feedback:)

It is available in paperback and e-book version!

Don t hesitate, order your copy now at Amazon!

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Here is a new Eminem pic I d like to share with you…please ask before taking, it belongs to the Weirdo Movement Page, it is posted with their permission ( credit to the Weirdo Movement Page © All Rights Reserved)
This picture was taken yesterday, on his birthday.

Today is Eminems birthday…post your birthday wishes if you d like.

Wishing you all, readers of my blog, a great day.

Isabelle

Despite her very busy schedule, my friend and fellow writer Donna Kshir took the time to review my book in the Detroit Examiner. Before I share her words with you, I would like to state that I am very grateful for her review.

Donnas opinion about my book

Detroit Examiner article

“I first met Isabelle Esling back in 2005. She was a talented young writer at The Eminem Blog. She immediately stood out to me, as she had a great passion and love for music. Isabelle has a gift of putting music into words. She has been enthusiastic about Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene for as far back as I can remember.
If you want to know Eminem the rapper, you first have to understand who Marshall Mathers is, where he comes from, what inspired him, his fight and struggle to succeed as an artist, and how those events made him the man he is today.
A young Marshall came from very humble beginnings. Those early beginnings also came complete with a dysfunctional family and a history of drug dependency. He knows what it feels like to be different, to be bullied and experience racism. Experiencing life on both the black and white sides of the Detroit ghetto provided a young Marshall with a valuable look into two very different, separate cultures giving him a love for music that would set the stage and eventually change rap music forever.
Marshall would spend a decade perfecting his rhyming skills and writing lyrics, but also building a reputation. His dream of rapping appeared impossible and maybe foolish to some; his family, friends and even his educators. No one wanted to believe in Marshall, making it that much harder for him to believe in himself, but his best friend Proof would give him enough courage, strength and inspiration that eventually made him one of the most successful artists of our time.
Marshall had several approaches to music, but using his turbulent youth and relationships with his mother, Debbie, and girlfriend, Kim, created a rebellious alter-ego that would set the stage and make him the superstar he desired to be.
Whether you have been a fan of Eminem for years or if have recently discovered him, this book is for you! I highly recommend EMINEM and the Detroit Rap Scene: White Kid in a Black Music World. Isabelle answers the tough questions so many fans desire to know. This book goes deeply within the reach of Eminem’s early years, the Detroit Rap Scene, what it is like to be a struggling artist in Detroit and his rise to the top with many added bonuses.
Isabelle’s insight alone gives the book credibility, but she digs much deeper showing how Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene have impacted our American culture. This book is more than a well-documented biography of the rapper’s life. Isabelle has been given her readers a level of access to Eminem that I feel no other journalist has come close to. Her insight takes the reader deep into the heart of the Detroit ghetto long before Eminem was a superstar. ”

Purchase your copy at:
-paperback version

-Nook Book

Who is Donna Kshir?

Donna is a Bestselling, Platinum Level Expert Author, Executive Producer, Child Abuse Prevention Advocate, Animal Rights Advocate, Radio Talk Show Host, President and Chief Development Officer at Dreamcatchers for Abused Children. Donna’s goal is to educate society on domestic violence, teen dating violence and child abuse by creating a series of educational books. Currently she has 12 published books, and recently opened her own publishing company; K-Pott Books. For more information, email Donna at: [email protected]

Official Donna Kshir website.

Dear readers,

I have been advertising my book „ Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene-White Kid In A Black Music” a lot. The reason is that I want more and more people to know about the existence of my book.
Like I said it numerous times, a writer is nothing without his or her readership. I love writing.
As most of you would probably know, I have been a music journalist for a decade now, expressing mainly on hip hop related subjects. “ Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene” is the fruit of a decade of work during which I gathered a lot of information about Eminem as a person and an artist and about the boiling Detroit rap scene that is so full of many talents. While I couldn’t t expose everybody, I did my best to make some great local talents shine
I would like to share this info with all of you, Eminem fans, Detroit rap lovers, hip hop lovers or with anybody that is just curious about my book.

Today I am addressing to the people who acquired a copy of my book or to all of you who intend to buy it in the future. While I am encouraging you to write some reviews on Amazon and Barnes and Noble, I would also be keen to expose your review on my media, especially the recently created “ Eminem and the Detroit Rap Scene on Blogger.

Id feature your review, place a little photo of you and give a little presentation of you on my different websites. Interested? Get back at me RIGHT NOW and let s go ahead this venture together!

Your author,

Isabelle Esling © All Rights Reserved

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